Dak Prescott Risking His Contract to Test Jerry Jones’ Grace

By contradicting him, Dak Prescott may be risking his contract by testing how much grace Jerry Jones has regarding the national anthem.
Jerry Jones Dak Prescott
Will Jerry Jones and his ego get in the way of his promising young quarterback? | Source: (i) Chuck Cook-USA TODAY Sports (ii) Elsa/Getty Images/AFP. Image edited by CCN.com.
  • Dak Prescott, like Jerry Jones, was against kneeling during the national anthem a few years ago.
  • Jones has since softened his stance but has still expressed a desire for the team to do something together. Prescott has stated he thinks it should be an individual decision.
  • Jones hasn’t taken well to people who don’t fall in line with his wishes. So, could he hold this against Prescott when they start contract talks again?

For Jerry Jones, winning games is the key, which is why he knows he needs to re-sign Dak Prescott. But it’s not all that matters to him. If he has made one thing clear as the Dallas Cowboys owner it’s this: it’s his team.

He calls the shots.

He fired the face of the franchise, Tom Landry, when he bought the team. Then he got rid of the guy who replaced him, Jimmy Johnson, when he started to become the new face of the franchise. When the world thought he should let Jason Garrett go, he kept him on for a few more years.

Jones likes control and power. That’s why Dak Prescott may be making a multi-million-dollar mistake by not toeing the company line anymore when it comes to national anthem protests.

Dak Prescott
Dak Prescott will soon be looking for Deshaun Watson money. | Source: Twitter

Dak Prescott and the National Anthem—Then

In his typical polarizing fashion, Jerry Jones made a strong statement back when players first started kneeling during the national anthem. His players would all ‘toe the line’ and stand during the national anthem or not play for the Dallas Cowboys.

The world waited for someone to test his claim and kneel anyway, but no one did. The outspoken Michael Bennett even stood after he joined the Cowboys. But what was even more surprising to some was how Dak Prescott backed Jerry Jones up:

His logic is easy to understand. But since he wasn’t falling in line with what people wanted him to say, he received a lot of flak for appearing to fall in line with what Jones wanted. Some took it as Prescott selling out while others took it as Jones flexing his power as the team’s owner.

Few saw it for it what it was—Prescott speaking his mind.

Dak Prescott and the National Anthem– Now

Fast forward to the present, and the story is a little different. Jones has not given specifics as to what the team’s policy is this year. However, he has expressed his desire for everyone to do something together, much as they did back in 2017.

This time, rather than back Jones up, Prescott is contradicting him. He thinks the choice to protest or not protest should be an individual one:

Could This Impact Future Negotiations?

While Jerry Jones has yet to say anything more than he will listen and have grace, players have said that they have the green light to do as they see fit. If that is indeed the case, then the only thing that will impact the next round of contract negotiations will be how this season plays out.

However, if the past is any indication, Jones could decide that he does not want a quarterback with as much or more influence than himself. By speaking up, Prescott has taken another step towards making the Cowboys his team and expanding his sphere of influence.

Players and fans will follow a leader that stands up more than one who evades questions and speaks in riddles. Should the Cowboys make a deep playoff run this year, the team will become Prescott’s even more.

Jones will not like that.

But can he have grace, see past his ego, and do what’s right by the team? Or will he hold this against Prescott and play hardball during negotiations?

When it comes to Jerry Jones, there’s no telling.

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Aaron Weaver edited this article for CCN.com. If you see a breach of our Code of Ethics or find a factual, spelling, or grammar error, please contact us.