Bryan Adams Becomes Relevant Again after ‘Racist’ Coronavirus Rant

May 12, 2020 10:33 AM UTC
Bryan Adams has attracted widespread criticism after describing Chinese people as "bat eating … bastards" in a post about coronavirus.
  • Bryan Adams has been criticized for racism after apparently describing Chinese people as “bat eating … bastards” in an Instagram post.
  • The Canadian singer was complaining about the coronavirus and the cancellation of concerts but has attracted more criticism than sympathy.
  • The post will do little to hurt Adams’ career and instead makes him vaguely relevant for the first time in years.

Bryan Adams has become relevant for the first time in decades, after publishing a “racist” Instagram post. In it, the Canadian music-torturer complained about cancelled shows, the coronavirus, and “bat eating … greedy bastards,” but rather than attract sympathy he merely attracted a wave of criticism.

Still, there’s no such thing as bad publicity. Particularly when you’re a no-talent bore like Bryan Adams who hasn’t released a good song in… ever.

Bryan Adams Doesn’t Like The Coronavirus, Or China

Yesterday, Bryan Adams took to Instagram to share a very dull song involving an acoustic guitar. Rather than leave it at that, he also took the opportunity to complain about how the coronavirus pandemic has resulted in several gigs of his being cancelled.

Source: Instagram

In fact, Adams didn’t stop there, because he also took the time to launch a tirade against the people who allegedly caused the coronavirus pandemic. He didn’t name any nation or people specifically, but he clearly had China in mind:

Tonight was supposed to be the beginning of a tenancy of gigs at the @royalalberthall, but thanks to some fucking bat eating, wet market animal selling, virus making greedy bastards, the whole world is now on hold.

His use of “bat eating, wet market animal selling, virus making greedy bastards” is a clear reference to Wuhan, where food markets are believed to have been the origin of the coronavirus pandemic. However, while he may be correct in identifying Wuhan as the coronavirus’ origin, his pejorative use of language quickly caused an internet storm of outrage.

Source: Twitter

The Summer of Covid One-Nine

More humorously, many people have taken the opportunity to mock Bryan Adams’ views and his flagging career. Basically, the consensus view is that Adams is such a money-obsessed ho that he’ll lash out with racism if any non-White American gets in his way of expanding his multimillion-dollar fortune.

Source: Twitter

Already, some people are also looking forward to Bryan Adams being “cancelled” as a result of his racism.

That said, anyone who actually cares about music has been cancelling Bryan Adams for decades. They didn’t need suspicions of racism to realise that his music was guff and that he must be some kind of pathological sadist to subject millions of innocent people to it.

Source: Twitter

On the other hand, some people have defended Bryan Adams. They claim that he wasn’t singling out Chinese people, but rather meat-eaters.

Source: Twitter

This may have some truth, but Katie Hopkins quickly dispelled any doubt that such phrases as “bat eating … bastards” are — for all intents and purposes — racist. The professional troll also came to Adams’ defence, in the process tarring the singer with her bigoted brush.

Source: Twitter

Career Boost

Of course, none of this is likely to significantly hurt Bryan Adams’ career. I mean, if his fans haven’t left him because of his terrible music, why would they leave him now? Particularly when so many Americans are already racist.

Indeed, this isn’t even the first time Bryan Adams has courted controversy.

For example, in 2014 Adams performed in Zimbabwe, with many arguing that this provided legitimacy to the authoritarian Mugabe regime.

Does anyone remember this? No. And in another six years, no one will remember the time Bryan Adams said “bat eating … bastards” on Instagram.

If anything, this will probably give Adams’ career a boost, by keeping him in the public eye and reminding potential fans that he’s still alive.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of CCN.com.

Samburaj Das edited this article for CCN.com. If you see a breach of our Code of Ethics or find a factual, spelling, or grammar error, please contact us.

@_simonchandler_

Markets Contributor for CCN living in London, UK. Has a Bachelor's degree in History and Archaeology from Reading University in 2006, and a Master's in Philosophy from King's College London in 2011. Also contributes to Forbes and Digital Trends, among others. Email me | Follow Me on Twitter | My Website | Muck Rack