court delayRoss Ulbricht will no longer be standing trial on November 10th, 2014 for his alleged part in the Silk Road underground marketplace. Instead, Wired Reporter Andy Greenberg has reported that the trial has been delayed by two months, to January 2015. Ross Ulbricht faces multiple charges of drug trafficking, computer hacking, money laundering, and “continuing a criminal enterprise.” The charges are serious to say the least.

Silk Road, an infamous Deep Net marketplace billed as “Amazon for drugs,” was taken offline by joint government agency action in October of 2013. On that day, the FBI captured Ross Ulbricht from a public library and is now currently trying to prove in court that Ross Ulbricht and DPR, the head of Silk Road, are one and the same. Since Silk Road 1.0’s demise, Silk Road 2.0 and a host of more secure competitors have arisen to fill the void midst growing realization that the War on Drugs has been a “trillion-dollar failure.”

The request for the extension was first submitted by the defense in consideration that the court case may run into the holiday season. The two-month extension will give Ulbricht’s defense more time to look over the prosecution’s evidence, including the terabytes upon terabytes of server data that seems to have been illegally obtained by federal authorities.

Ross Ulbricht Silk Road Court Case Will Set Precedents

Ross Ulbricht SketchMany around the world continue to question the legality of the government’s case against Ross Ulbricht and the Silk Road. Recently, Judge Katherine Forrest struck down the Ulbricht’s attempt to suppress evidence relating to Silk Road servers hacked in Iceland by the FBI. The court’s decision validates the FBI’s ability to hack into any non-US server and could have rippling effects long after this court case is over. In the future, when further Deep Net services are brought down by coordinated government action, such as ITOM, have no doubt that the Ross Ulbricht Silk Road case and its procedures will be cited, for better or for worse.

What do you think about Ross Ulbricht’s case? Comment below!

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