John McAfee Interview: Magic, Money, 2020 Presidential Fugitive

Nicole Grinstead @nrdgrl007
June 24, 2019 01:45 UTC

By CCN Markets: International man of mystery, wanted fugitive, 2020 presidential candidate. What do all of these have in common? John McAfee.

In an exclusive interview, CCN talked to McAfee about his new trading portal ‘McAfee Magic,’ his views on money, and his troubles with the government. Here’s everything he had to say:

Magic Arbitrage Trading Platform

McAfee’s new trading platform ‘Magic’ promises exponential returns, but is it too good to be true?

As CCN reported previously, McAfee’s new magic trading platform went live earlier this month. But we haven’t talked much about the debit cards associated with it yet.  We know that the cards will require very little KYC, they’ll have a QR code on the back so you can easily load bitcoin, you can use the card anywhere that accepts Visa, and there are “no limits.” But the term “no limit” seems a bit dubious, so we asked McAfee to clear that up. He said:

” it does have to abide by Visa’s card limits. You can buy a 100k vehicle, but it may have to be in multiple payments.”

Further, we asked McAfee – who is on the run for tax evasion – how a card with ‘no limits’ will impact a user’s tax liability. Specifically, because banks are required to notify the IRS of transactions over $10k.  McAfee said:

“lol, as always, tax liability will be on the user; so, it’s their choice to file their use.”

A word to the wise: Make sure you file your taxes on all cryptocurrency gains. The IRS will come after those who don’t.

McAfee on Money, Taxes, & Freedom Coin

John McAfee has been very vocal about his libertarian belief that taxes are slavery. He posts it on social media, says so in his keynote speeches, and he’s even launching his own cryptocurrency ‘freedom coin’ later this year. McAfee’s position on taxes is transparent. But how would governments fund social programs – like public school, Medicare, and Medicaid –   without them? He said:

“The way they are funded in dozens of other countries like the Bahamas, which has no income tax… through paying for government services as you use them. For example: charging a fee per mile driven on federal roads. The US government is simply too lazy to implement them.”

Okay, so McAfee just said that people who use public welfare programs should have to pay as they go. While that might be fine for some, others – whose income falls below the poverty line and are already tax exempt – would undoubtedly find that burden unbearable. Further, the Bahamas has one of the highest economic and social inequality measurements in the Caribbean. Simultaneously, Bahamian income inequality continues to widen.

Specifically, speaking of Freedom Coin, McAfee says that the coin will have no trading value against bitcoin or any fiat currency, it won’t be traded on exchanges, and there won’t be an ICO. In his recent CoinsBank Blockchain Cruise keynote address McAfee urged anyone listening to…

“Free your selves. Do not let your greed bring you back into the world you are trying to escape.”

So, CCN asked if McAfee has any tips or advice for how people who don’t have any money but still need it to pay their bills could hope to free themselves. McAfee didn’t answer.

McAfee’s Life on the Run & 2020 Presidential Campaign

McAfee on the run | Source: Twitter

Finally, it was time to discuss John McAfee’s struggles with the government and his unusual campaign slogan: “Don’t Vote for Me.”

CCN asked McAfee – now accused of a murder  – if the law was after him for despite the US having no jurisdiction in Belize or the Bahamas.

“the US government manufactures whatever evidence it wants. An ex-CIA agent named Jeremy Kent, going under the name of Patrick Costello, has forced people, under duress, to claim a number of fake events, [including] that I murdered my father in Virginia when I was 15 years old.”

McAfee also pointed to “proof” that Kent was a CIA agent.

Last, CCN asked McAfee what would happen if his followers took heed of his advice to write in the names of obscure candidates instead of voting for someone who was already on the ballot. For whom would his followers typically vote? Who would that help, and who would it hurt?

“Please understand. A vote of ‘No Confidence’ has terminated many corrupt groups of people in power in Parliamentary systems of government. It is exactly the same principle – only applied to voters.”

Hmmm… Okay, whatever you say, John!

This McAfee gif showcases the outspoken bitcoin bull’s DGAF personality. Source: Giphy

While he certainly has some interesting theories, this reporter isn’t so sure. Would a vote of “no confidence” really operate the same in a presidential system as a parliamentary one? And should people have to pay for public services as they use them instead of paying taxes?

Last modified: June 25, 2019 10:10 UTC

Nicole Grinstead @nrdgrl007

Nicole is a fintech journalist and a marketing consultant. Like a true cypherpunk, she advocates that cryptography and privacy-enhancing technologies are routes to social and political change. Nicole is a citizen of the world who currently resides in Boise, ID, USA. You can contact her by emailing nicole@007nerd.com or follow her on Twitter @nrdgrl007.