Posted in: EntertainmentOp-ed
Published:
March 19, 2020 3:45 PM UTC

I’d Rather Catch Coronavirus Than Watch Gal Gadot’s Imagine Cover Again

I swear, I'd rather catch coronavirus than watch Gal Gadot's cringeworthy and insanely hypocritical "Imagine" cover again.

  • Wonder Woman star Gal Gadot covered John Lennon’s “Imagine” in a glitzy Instagram sing-a-long.
  • The video is ridiculously cringeworthy.
  • It’s a classic example of the “liberal” pretenses of Hollywood, which likely wouldn’t exist in a world modeled after “Imagine.”

Yikes, that Gal Gadot “Imagine” video was godawful. Ostensibly an attempt to make coronavirus isolation seem less scary, it actually had the opposite effect.

Gal Gadot and her cringeworthy singing have made the wait for the coronavirus pandemic’s end even more excruciating.

I swear, I’d rather contract COVID-19 than watch another Hollywood star sing pretentiously about their own moral superiority.

Imagine Gal Gadot Didn’t Exist

In case you’re lucky enough to have avoided Gal Gadot’s viral Instagram video, here’s a recap.

Gadot began the clip by talking about how she’s in “day six” of “self-quarantine.” The past few days have made her “philosophical,” apparently, and “blah, blah, blah.”

I forget the rest.

Source: Instagram

After a minute or so of talking out of her fundament, Gadot suddenly says, “And it goes like this…”

It’s here that she launches into a rendition of John Lennon’s “Imagine.”

If it weren’t already bad enough to hear one Hollywood millionaire sing this left-wing anthem, the video then cuts to a second Hollywood millionaire singing the next part of its verse. And then another. And so on, for an almost unbearable three minutes.

It’s that bad.

After watching it, I had to take a very long shower, scouring myself with Brillo pads from head to toe. I still feel icky.

And I’m not the only one who was disgusted. Twitter recoiled with near-universal repulsion.

Source: Twitter

On the other hand, it strengthened many viewers’ resolve to fight the coronavirus outbreak. If only because this is what happens when Hollywood actors can’t work. They quickly grow paranoid that the world will forget them.

Source: Twitter

‘Imagine’ Is Not an Anthem Hollywood Should Be Singing

There’s something truly repellent about Gal Gadot and a bunch of very rich Hollywood types singing John Lennon’s “Imagine.”

Take a look at the song’s second verse:

Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man
Imagine all the people sharing all the world

Imagine no possessions? No greed? No doubt, this is something very hard for Hollywood A-listers to do.

The whole enterprise of “making it” in Hollywood presupposes greed, a greed for status as well as a greed for material possessions. A world without greed would likely be a world without Hollywood.

“Imagine” is the last anthem Gal Gadot – or any Hollywood millionaire, for that matter – should be singing. | Source: JStone/Shutterstock.

Really, if Gal Gadot and her crooning chums truly believed in “Imagine,” they wouldn’t live in Hollywood. Beyond paying for essentials (and no, a mansion or extra sports car is not an “essential”), they would direct every excess dollar they earned to progressive causes.

They’d spend every extra penny and minute supporting NGOs, campaign groups, charities, and so on. They would support the electoral campaigns of people like, say, Bernie Sanders, rather than attend fundraisers for Joe Biden. Joe effing Biden!

But no, they’re much happier raking in millions and filming the occasional tokenistic nod to being a “liberal,” whatever the hell that is.

So let’s hope this coronavirus pandemic ends quickly, if only to stop them from subjecting us to another BS sing-a-long.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the views of CCN.com.

This article was edited by Josiah Wilmoth.

Simon Chandler @_simonchandler_

Simon Chandler is a journalist based in London, UK. He writes mostly about markets, and has bylines for Forbes, Wired, the Sun, RT.com, the Daily Dot, the New Internationalist, TechCrunch, the Verge, Lifewire, Cointelegraph, and VentureBeat, among others.

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